Raspberry Pi 3B+ / 3B plus Motherboard - PiBOX (Board only)

PiBOX India Presents: Raspberry Pi 3B+ Pi Board
1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARMv8 CPU, 1 GB RAM
802.11n Wireless LAN, 10/100Mbps Lan Speed- WIFI, Bluetooth 4.2, Bluetooth Low Energy
4 USB ports, 40 GPIO pins, Full HDMI port, Combined 3.5mm audio jack and composite video
Camera interface (CSI),Display interface (DSI), Micro SD card slot (now push-pull rather than push-push), VideoCore IV 3D graphics core

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RPI 3 Model B PLUS
₹3,700.00
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The latest Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ has a faster 64-bit 1.4GHz quad core processor, 1GB of RAM, faster dual-band 802.11 b/g/n/ac wireless LAN, Bluetooth 4.2, and significantly faster 300Mbit/s ethernet.

    1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU (BCM2837)
    1GB RAM (LPDDR2 SDRAM)
    On-board wireless LAN - dual-band 802.11 b/g/n/ac (CYW43455)
    On-board Bluetooth 4.2 HS low-energy (BLE) (CYW43455)
    4 x USB 2.0 ports
    300Mbit/s ethernet
    40 GPIO pins
    Full size HDMI 1.3a port
    Combined 3.5mm analog audio and composite video jack
    Camera interface (CSI)
    Display interface (DSI)
    microSD slot
    VideoCore IV multimedia/3D graphics core @ 400MHz/300MHz

With the ARMv8 processor it can run the full range of ARM GNU/Linux distributions, including Snappy Ubuntu Core, as well as Microsoft Windows 10 IoT edition.

You will need the latest NOOBS image for the Wireless LAN and Bluetooth drivers to be installed. We sell a pre-imaged NOOBS card
Faster processing

Improved thermals on the Pi 3 B+ means that the CPU on the BCM2837 SoC can now run at 1.4GHz, a 17% increase on the previous Pi 3 model (which ran at 1.2GHz).

Video performance on Pi 3 B+ is similar to the previous generation Pi 3, the VideoCore being clocked at 400MHz for video processing and the 3D graphics processor running at 300MHz.
Faster wireless

A significant change on the Pi 3 B+ compared to the Pi 3 is the inclusion of a new faster, dual-band wireless chip (CYW43455) with 802.11 b/g/n/ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2.

The dual-band 2.4GHz and 5GHz wireless LAN enables faster networking with less interference (although the higher bandwidth has less range), and the new PCB antenna technology should allow better reception.

Bluetooth allows you to use a wireless keyboard/trackpad without extra dongles, keeping things nice and tidy.
Faster ethernet

The Pi 3 B+ has significantly faster wired networking, thanks to an upgraded USB/LAN chip, and you should see speeds that are 3-5x faster than on previous models of the Pi, at least 300Mbit/s.
GPIO and layout

The GPIO header remains the same, with 40 pins, as on the previous three models of Pi. However, it should be noted that the new PoE header pins may contact components on the underside of some HATs, like Rainbow HAT. Some standoffs will prevent any mischief from occurring though!

The metal shielding on the wireless circuitry and the SoC may also cause shorts against larger components on the underside of HATs, pHATs, and SHIMs. In the first two cases, standoffs will help again; in the latter, a couple of small pieces of insulating tape or Kapton tape will prevent any shorts.


It has improved power management to support more powerful external USB devices and now comes with built-in wireless and Bluetooth connectivity.


To take full advantage of the improved power management on the Raspberry Pi 3 and provide support for even more powerful devices on the USB ports, a 2.5A adapter is required. Technical Specifications: - Broadcom BCM2837BO 64 bit ARMv8 QUAD Core A53 64bit Processor powered Single Board Computer run at 1.4GHz - 1GB RAM - BCM43143 WiFi on board - Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) on board - 40 pin extended GPIO - 4 x USB2 ports - 4 pole Stereo output and Composite video port - Full size HDMI - CSI camera port for connecting the Raspberry Pi camera - DSI display port for connecting the Raspberry Pi touch screen display - MicroSD port for loading your operating system and storing data - Upgraded switched Micro USB power source (now supports up to 2.5 Amps.

More Information
FAQ's

What are the differences between Raspberry Pi models?

These are the models of the Raspberry Pi which are currently available: the Pi 3 Model B, the Pi 2 Model B, the Pi Zero, the Pi Zero W and the Pi 1 Model B+ and A+.

 

Product

SoC

Speed

RAM

USB Ports

Ethernet

Wireless/

Bluetooth

Raspberry Pi Model A+

BCM2835

700MHz

512MB

1

No

No

Raspberry Pi Model B+

BCM2835

700MHz

512MB

4

Yes

No

Raspberry Pi 2 Model B

BCM2836/7

900MHz

1GB

4

Yes

No

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B

BCM2837

1200MHz

1GB

4

Yes

Yes

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

BCM2837

1400MHz

1GB

4

Yes

Yes

Raspberry Pi Zero

BCM2835

1000MHz

512MB

1

No

No

Raspberry Pi Zero W

BCM2835

1000MHz

512MB

1

No

Yes

Raspberry Pi Zero WH

BCM2835

1000MHz

512MB

1

No

Yes

 

Where is the on/off switch?

There is no on/off switch! To switch on, just plug it in. To switch off, if you are in the graphical environment, you can either log out from the main menu, exit to the Bash prompt, or open the terminal. From the Bash prompt or terminal you can shut down the Raspberry Pi by entering sudo halt -h. Wait until all the LEDs except the power LED are off, then wait an additional second to make sure the SD card can finish its wear-levelling tasks and write actions. You can now safely unplug the Raspberry Pi. Failure to shut the Raspberry Pi down properly may corrupt your SD card, which would mean you would have to re-image it.

What are the dimensions of the Raspberry Pi?

The Raspberry Pi Model B versions measure 85.60mm x 56mm x 21mm (or roughly 3.37″ x 2.21″ x 0.83″), with a little overlap for the SD card and connectors which project over the edges. They weigh 45g. The Pi Zero and Pi Zero W measure 65mm x 30mm x 5.4mm (or roughly 2.56″ x 1.18″ x 0.20″) and weigh 9g. For the mechanical outlines,

What operating system does it use?

The recommended distribution (distro) is Raspbian, which is specifically designed for the Raspberry Pi and which our engineers are constantly optimising.

I heard about something called rpi-update. When should I use that?

Unless using it is recommended by a Raspberry Pi engineer, you should not use rpi-update. It updates to the very, very latest test firmware and kernel software, which may not work correctly under all circumstances.

Will it run Wine or Windows, or other x86 software?

In general, this is not possible with most versions of the Raspberry Pi. Some people have put Windows 3.1 on the Raspberry Pi inside an x86 CPU emulator in order to use specific applications, but trying to use a version of Windows even as recent as Windows 98 can take hours to boot into, and may take several more hours to update your cursor every time you try to move it. We don't recommend it! As of summer 2015, a version of Windows 10 is available for use on the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. This is an entirely new version of the operating system designed exclusively for embedded use, dubbed the Windows 10 Internet of Things (IoT) Core. It does not include the user interface (shell) or the desktop operating system.

Will it run Android or Android Things?

Raspberry Pi themselves do not support the consumer version of Android that you may be familiar with from your mobile phone. There are community efforts to make a version available that can be found online.

Google supports Android Things on the Raspberry Pi 3 as a development platform. Android Things is a variant of the Android platform enabling developers to build software for embedded and Internet of Things (IoT) devices with the Android SDK. To learn more about the platform and how to get started, visit developer.android.com/things.

Will it run old software?

In general, you need to look to see whether the program you want can be compiled for the Armv6 (Pi 1/Zero/Zero W/CM), Armv7 (Pi 2) or Armv8 (Pi 3) architecture on Linux. In most cases, the answer will be yes. Specific programs are discussed on our forums, so you might want to look there for an answer. Ultimately, nothing beats grabbing a Raspberry Pi and finding out the answer through direct testing!

My .exe file won't run!

Most .exe files come from Windows and are compiled for the x86 processor architecture. These will not run on the Raspberry Pi, which uses an ARM processor architecture. A minority of .exe files, compiled from C# code or similar, actually use a Byte Code rather than a processor-specific instruction set, and therefore might work on the Pi if the correct Mono interpreter software is installed.

Can I share files from my Pi with my Windows machines?

Yes, there are a number of ways of doing this, and the most common is to use what are called Samba shares. We don't have any specific documentation on Samba shares in our official docs just yet,

Why is there no VGA support?

Whilst there is no native VGA support, active adapters are available. Passive HDMI to VGA cables will not work with the Raspberry Pi. When purchasing an active VGA adapter, make sure it comes with an external power supply. HDMI to VGA adapters without an external power supply often fail to work.

Does the HDMI port support CEC?

Yes, the HDMI port on the Raspberry Pi supports the CEC Standard. CEC may be called something else by your TV's manufacturer

Can I add a touchscreen?

The Raspberry Pi Foundation provides a 7" capacitive touchscreen that utilises the Raspberry Pi's DSI port. This is available through the usual distributors. Alternatively, several third-party retailers offer a range of touchscreens for the Raspberry Pi.

What are the power requirements?

The device is powered by 5V micro USB. Exactly how much current (mA) the Raspberry Pi requires is dependent on which model you are using, and what you hook up to it. We recommend a 2.5A (2500mA) power supply, from a reputable retailer, that will provide you with enough power to run your Raspberry Pi for most applications, including use of the 4 USB ports. Very high-demand USB devices may however require the use of a powered hub.

The table below outlines the specific power requirements of each model.

Product

Recommended PSU current capacity

Maximum total USB peripheral current draw

Typical bare-board active current consumption

Raspberry Pi Model A

700mA

500mA

200mA

Raspberry Pi Model B

1.2A

500mA

500mA

Raspberry Pi Model A+

700mA

500mA

180mA

Raspberry Pi Model B+

1.8A

600mA/1.2A (switchable)

330mA

Raspberry Pi 2 Model B

1.8A

600mA/1.2A (switchable)

350mA

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B

2.5A

1.2A

400mA

Raspberry Pi Zero W/WH

1.2A

Limited by PSU, board, and connector ratings only.

150mA

Raspberry Pi Zero

1.2A

Limited by PSU, board, and connector ratings only

100mA

 

The specific current requirements of each model are dependent on the use case: the PSU recommendations are based on typical maximum current consumption, the typical current consumption is for each board in a desktop computer configuration. The Raspberry Pi Model A, A+, and B can supply a maximum of 500mA to downstream USB peripherals. If you wish to connect a high-power USB device, it is recommended that you connect a powered USB hub to the Pi and connect your peripherals to the USB hub. The Raspberry Pi B+ and 2 Model B can supply 600mA/1.2A to downstream USB peripherals, switchable by a firmware setting. This allows the vast majority of USB devices to be connected directly to these models, assuming the upstream power supply has sufficient available current. Very high-current devices or devices which can draw a surge current such as certain modems and USB hard disks will still require an external powered USB hub. The power requirements of the Raspberry Pi increase as you make use of the various interfaces on the Raspberry Pi. The GPIO pins can draw 50mA safely (note that that means 50mA distributed across all the pins: an individual GPIO pin can only safely draw 16mA), the HDMI port uses 50mA, the Camera Module requires 250mA, and keyboards and mice can take as little as 100mA or as much as 1000mA! Check the power rating of the devices you plan to connect to the Pi and purchase a power supply accordingly. If you're not sure, we would advise you to buy a powered hub.

Here is a table comparing the amount of power drawn in A (amps) under different situations:

           

 

 

Pi1 (B+)

Pi2 B

Pi3 B (amps)

Zero (amps)

Boot

Max

0.26

0.4

0.75

0.2

 

Avg

0.22

0.22

0.35

0.15

Idle

Avg

0.2

0.22

0.3

0.1

Video playback (H.264)

Max

0.3

0.36

0.55

0.23

 

Avg

0.22

0.28

0.33

0.16

Stress

Max

0.35

0.82

1.34

0.35

 

Avg

0.32

0.75

0.85

0.23

 

Test conditions used a standard Raspbian image (current as of 26 Feb 2016), at room temperature, connected to a HDMI monitor, USB keyboard and mouse. The Pi 3 Model B was connected to a WiFi access point. All these power measurements do not take into account power consumption from additional USB devices; they can easily be exceeded with multiple additional USB devices connected or when using a HAT.

Can I power the Raspberry Pi from a USB hub?

It depends on the hub. Some hubs comply with the USB 2.0 Standard and only provide 500mA per port, which may not be enough to power your Raspberry Pi. Other hubs view the USB standards more like guidelines, and will provide as much power as you want from each port. Please also be aware that some hubs have been known to backfeed the Raspberry Pi. This means that the hubs will power the Raspberry Pi through its USB input cable, without the need for a separate micro-USB power cable, and bypass the voltage protection. If you are using a hub that backfeeds to the Raspberry Pi and the hub experiences a power surge, your Raspberry Pi could potentially be damaged.

Can I power the Raspberry Pi from batteries as well as from a wall socket?

Running the Raspberry Pi directly from batteries requires special care and can result in damaging or destroying your Raspberry Pi. If you consider yourself an advanced user, though, you could have a go. For example, four of the most common AA rechargeable batteries would provide 4.8V on a full charge. 4.8V would technically be just within the range of tolerance for the Raspberry Pi, but the system would quickly become unstable as the batteries lost their full charge. Conversely, using four AA Alkaline (non-rechargeable) batteries will result in 6V. 6V is outside the acceptable tolerance range and would potentially damage or, in the worst-case scenario, destroy your Raspberry Pi. It is possible to provide a steady 5V from batteries by using a buck and/or boost circuit, or by using a charger pack which is specifically designed to output a steady 5V from a couple of batteries; these devices are typically marketed as mobile phone emergency battery chargers.

What voltage devices can I attach to the GPIO pins, and how much current can I pull?

The GPIO pins are natively 3.3V, so 5V devices MUST NOT be attached directly without some sort of voltage conversion. The pins can provide up to 16mA current.

What size of SD card do I need?

Whether you want to use the NOOBS installer or a standalone image, the minimum size SD card we recommend using is 8GB. This will give you the free space you need to install additional packages or make programs of your own. The original Raspberry Pi Model A and Model B require full-size SD cards. The newer Raspberry Pi Model A+, Model B+, 2B, 3B, 3B+, Zero, ZeroW and ZeroWH require micro SD cards.

What size of SD card can it support?

We have tried cards up to 128GB, and most cards seem to work OK. You can also attach a USB stick or USB hard drive to provide extra storage.

Can I boot a Pi from a USB-attached hard drive instead of the SD card?

Yes, booting from a USB-attached drive (either a SSD or actual hard drive) can make the Pi boot and work faster.

What happens if I brick the device?

If you brick the device, you can restore it by reflashing the SD card.

Does the device support networking?

The Model B, Model B+, and Pi 2 and 3 Model B versions of the device have built in 10/100 wired Ethernet. There is no Ethernet on the Model A, Model A+, and Zero versions.

Is there built-in WiFi?

Only the Pi 3, 3+ and Pi Zero W have built-in wireless connectivity, but all other models can support a USB WiFi dongle. The Foundation offers its own branded WiFi dongle which has been fully tested for use with the Raspberry Pi. The Raspberry Pi Model 3B+ supports 802.11ac, all previous models support up to 802.11n.

Is there built-in Bluetooth?

Only on the Pi 3 models and on the Pi Zero W.

Does the device have support for any form of netbooting or PXE?

Yes. The Raspberry Pi 3 can be set up to network boot without an SD card present; earlier models can PXE/Netboot with an appropriately set up SD card.

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